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Monthly Archives: September 2011

Much loved elder and teacher, the late Wiremu Tawhai, on working between languages

image credit: tpk.govt.nz

Click here to listen to a conversation with                                                          Wiremu Tawhai on Working Between Languages

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Wiremu Tawhai, loved and respected teacher of language and culture, scholar, author, actor and elder of Te Whanau o Apanui tribe, speaks about his passion for the Maori language, the importance of traditional languages and knowledge, and of his efforts in language recovery in a tribal institution of higher learning in Aotearoa New Zealand and in his own community.

Patu Hohepa on Working Between Languages

image credit: greenpeace

Click here to hear a conversation with Maori elder and scholar Dr Patu Hohepa (Ngapuhi tribe) and retired New Zealand Maori Language Commissioner, on working between languages

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Executive Chair of the New Zealand Maori Council, Manu Paul, on working between languages

image credit: TVNZ

Click here to hear a conversation with Maori elder Manu Paul (Ngati Rangitihi tribe), Executive Chair of the New Zealand Maori Council and organic farmer, on working between languages

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See below for a transcript of this conversation:

Manu Paul: So in terms of language and the indigenousness nature of people it seems to me that what the world needs to know is that language is Poutokomanawa [ridge pole or centre pole] of diversity. Alright? I’m reminded of that song about the 60’s or 70’s “and they all lived in little boxes and they all looked just the same”. Alright?  The message there is that difference is to be lauded. Diversity is to be grasped so that you have a standard to measure yourself against because how else would you know how good you are?

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“Is Gaelic an Indigenous Language?”

Some time after a conversation with Makere Stewart-Harawira, Outer Hebridean Gaelic language learner and teacher Gordon Wells ventured into contentious territory on his personal blog, where a range of comments can also be found.

Is Gaelic an Indigenous Language?

“Stupid question.” That’s the short answer, tinged perhaps with weariness, perhaps indignation. “Of course it is. Next question.”

Well, there is a next question – indigenous to where? And so what? We need deeper reflection in a British/UK context, where indigenous or aboriginal status may be most loudly proclaimed by sometimes closet, sometimes open, racists of a self-styled “British nationalist” perspective affecting to speak on behalf of the “original” (read white) English, Scottish, Welsh, and Irish peoples.

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On Globalization

Click here to listen to conversations in English on Globalization with Maori and Gaelic speakers involved with indigenous language revitalization efforts.

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See below for a transcription:

Makere Stewart-Harawira: Where does indigenous self determination sit in this mix and what is it that is the really critical thing about this revitalization of language and culture?  What is the really important…why is it so important? What is critical about that? Huge questions, too big, I know…

Sir Mason Durie: I will try and tackle the last one because it might lead on and just talking off the top of my head if that is all right?  I see that whole indigenous movement and I am putting in the movement the language cultural revitalization and the political independence or a variant of it to a greater or lesser extent.  Through the whole indigenous movement to me it’s done two things.  First of all I think it is potentially acting as a protector of the worst excesses of globalization.

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Wiremu Tawhai on language learning and teaching and globalization

image credit: tpk.govt.nv

Click here to listen to the conversation with Wiremu Tawhai

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Wiremu Tawhai, much loved and respected Te Whanau o Apanui elder, scholar, author, actor, and teacher of language and culture, speaks about his passion for the Maori language, the importance of traditional languages and knowledge, and of his efforts in language recovery in a tribal institution of higher learning in Aotearoa New Zealand and in his own community.

See below for transcript of this conversation:

Wiremu Tawhai: Whether we succeed or not, and you know, the treaty hui we had the other day, may link us up with tangata takitaki, originals, indigenous of the world [31:23]. My best hope is that that will happen and that we become excited because we’re part of a movement across the world; we’re part of a tidal wave, so to speak. And we become excited because we have a contribution (more…)

Professor and Elder Patu Hohepa, on impacts of globalization

image credit: greenpeace

Click here to listen to a conversation with Maori elder and scholar Dr Patu Hohepa (Ngapuhi tribe), retired Maori Language Commissioner for Aotearoa New Zealand, on some impacts of globalization on Maori and language

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Gaelic scholar and poet Maoilios Caimbeul on Globalization

image credit: Mike Mackay

Click here to listen to a conversation with Gaelic author, scholar and poet, Maoilios Caimbeul of Skye, on the impacts of globalization on Gaelic

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See below for a transcription of this conversation:

Maoilios Um…there is a person in Edinburgh university, I knew it was Clauss(?) as well (laughs)

Ma- Oh really (laughs)

Maoilios I first, she’s done a study of this, she’s doing a PhD on how things have translated from one language to the other.

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Maori scholar Hemi Dale on Maori language and globalization and Gaelic scholar and poet, Maoilios Caimbeul of Skye on media and values

 

Click here to listen to excerpts from a conversation at Auckland University with Hemi Dale, of Te Uri o Tai and Te Rarawa tribes about globalization, Maori language teaching, and education policyas well as an excerpt from a talk with Gaelic scholar and poet, Maoilios Caimbeul of Skye on media and values

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See below for a transcript of this conversation:

Hemi- We have to be really vigilant in ensuring that we are not disadvantaged by that.  It seems quite plain to me that there are some (???) officials living in the university who pose (?) in terms of recruitment of Maori for our program. 

And again one important point that I need to make again.  We are not a Maori only pathway.  Our students are predominantly Maori but also those who aren’t Maori who are committed to Maori and so we are (?) part of our students come through.  And you know work out, that relationship stuff in terms of not, what is ok, what is not ok in terms of taking particular roles.  (???) So we’ve got a group of students in the moment who came in through a foundation program, hadn’t done any formal training in secondary school but came into our pathway, speakers of (Samoan?) and they are on their way to becoming trilingual.  So that is amazing stuff that happens, and we have an open door like that.  And I think if we can attract more and more and build our- the core in terms of what we do here. 

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Professor Mason Durie on Maori and Global Citizenship

image credit: Massey University

Click here to listen to a conversation with Sir Mason Durie

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Professor of Māori Research and Development & Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori & Pasifika), Massey University, Aotearoa New Zealand, statesman  and elder (Ngāti Kauwhata, Ngāti Raukawa, Rangitane tribes) talks about the global indigenous movement, Maori participation and Maori as global citizens.

See below for a transcription of this conversation:

Mason Durie:I think that the indigenous rejuvenation and reassertion is in fact a global movement. It’s not,  It is certainly not unique to Maori and so by getting involved in that there is already a move to be part of a global movement and global citizenship has got more than one meaning in this sense and that in enables Maori to be part of the indigenous world movement and that’s been quite important I think as, and not only important in terms of a sense of solidarity that economically is going to be important too  you can imagine business ventures and economic where you’ll get preferred providers who might haven’t be Indigenous whether it is in fishing or some other arrangement.

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